February, Already?

AR Test
AR Test

I am shocked to look at the calendar, and realize that February is almost over.

Where to begin?  Well, the test with ChromeOS is going well.  I have found that I need the access to my R810 less and less as I move things over to the Pixelbook.  I have even found myself doing some light python coding on it.  The flexibility and the speed is very nice.  I have also been enjoying one of the major benefits of the Chromebook life style: major battery life.  I can take my Pixel out of the bag when I get to the office and not plug it in all day, and still have a couple of hours of juice left over when I get home.

On of the things that I am still not totally sure about is doing my photo workflow.  I have been doing some reading, and finding a few tools to play with.  To that end, I am going to set myself a challenge of taking, processing, and posting a photo at least once a week.  As I get more comfortable, I might even move that up to many a week.  It will be good to get back into that as I have done that in the past, but I did fail the last time I tried daily.

The photo above is from my playing around with ‘Augmented Reality’ which is all the fade now days with ‘virtual stickers’ you can insert into photos.

A month in, using ChromeOS only

As I pointed out a while back that I was moving to ChromeOS more seriously.  Well, since Christmas day, I have parked my R810 to the side, and installed Chromium OS on my Lenovo X260 and started using it full time.  What is Chromium OS?  It is the open source version of ChromeOS.

So far, everything has been working great.  The only thing that has not worked for me is DRM protected video stream, things like Netflix, Hulu, or Amazon Video.  Not a major lost, but I missed it on a recent trip.

The other major issue I have run into is photo processing and management.  Under ChromeOS, there is not many options for this, only pure web-based solutions like Google Photos.  There are some pretty decent solutions in the Android world.  How does this help me?  Well, the newer version of ChromeOS running on newer Chromebooks can run Android apps.

Sadly, my Acer C720 and HP Chrombook 11 G1 are both too old to get the Android solutions.  Additionally, both systems are starting showing their age in running modern web apps.  So, my solution?  I am buying a Google Pixelbook.  I opted for the smaller of the versions which should have more than enough horsepower for me to run for many years.  It arrives today, so I will be having some fun setting it up.

Really moving in on the Chromebook

As I mentioned a while back that I was experimenting with using a Chromebook, I decide to see how far I could take it.  On my recent trip to the UK, I only took my Acer C720 with me.  During the trip, I used it for things like uploading photos I took, Skype to chat with the family, checking email and news, and remote access while in the hotel room.

This worked out pretty well, to the point where I am trying to use it or my HP Chromebook 11 G1 full time.  While I can get lots of things done in a browser now days, there are some things I find my self sshing back to another box to do.  So, I decided to see if I could do that on the Chromebooks.

The ‘normal’ way is to install Linux into a chroot using something call Courton. I have done that in the past, but the work flow is not something I can adapt to easily as it involves more than a simple key combo to switch between.

I found a project called “Chromebrew” in the vein of “Homebrew” for MacOS.  Setup is pretty simple as I had turned on Developers mode on my boxes a long time ago, so it was a matter of downloading a script, reading it, and then running it.

From there, I used the crew command to install some basic tools (git, vim, & python), and I can now do 90% or more of my day-to-day work on the Chromebooks.

The only thing that I have not figured out yet is a decent VPN solution, but I am working on that.

I suppose at some point, I will upgrade one of the Chromebooks to one of the newer generation which can run Android apps as well.

Night Mode for ChromeOS

So, what is night-mode?  It is a mode for changing the color temperature of computer screens to be ‘warmer’ (more red-tones, less blue tones).  Why?  The strong blue tones (and whites) from most computer screens help trick your mind into thinking it is still day, and therefor you need to be awake.

I have been trying to enable night mode on all the things for a while now.  For my android phone, I use twilight for Android (IOS has something built in now), Solus Linux added it in the most recent release, Gnome has it in the later releases, and under i3, I use xflux.

However, I could not find anything for the Chromebooks….until now! 9to5Google.com has a story about the feature coming soon to ChromeOS, but they claim that you need to be on the very latest development branch called ‘Canary’.  I tend to run on the Developers branch, and did not want to switch.  I did a bit of digging, and found this reddit thread which has the feature flag to set:


Normal warnings, this can lead to breakage of your system.

I have enabled it, and it is looking good so far!

Welcome to the New Look

I have been running a bit of an experiment recently by using a Chromebook while not at home.  So far, it has been going fairly well with the exception that I cannot easily update this site.  So, I switched to something which lets me use the web to update.

I have all the posts moved over, but I will have to do a bit of cleanup around categories and move the photos over.  A lot of the older posts suffer from being imported into a few different blogging platforms, so that may take time.