Night Mode for ChromeOS

So, what is night-mode?  It is a mode for changing the color temperature of computer screens to be ‘warmer’ (more red-tones, less blue tones).  Why?  The strong blue tones (and whites) from most computer screens help trick your mind into thinking it is still day, and therefor you need to be awake.

I have been trying to enable night mode on all the things for a while now.  For my android phone, I use twilight for Android (IOS has something built in now), Solus Linux added it in the most recent release, Gnome has it in the later releases, and under i3, I use xflux.

However, I could not find anything for the Chromebooks….until now! 9to5Google.com has a story about the feature coming soon to ChromeOS, but they claim that you need to be on the very latest development branch called ‘Canary’.  I tend to run on the Developers branch, and did not want to switch.  I did a bit of digging, and found this reddit thread which has the feature flag to set:

chrome://flags/#ash-enable-night-light

Normal warnings, this can lead to breakage of your system.

I have enabled it, and it is looking good so far!

Home Network Updates

So, in the last couple of weeks, I have had the following issues:

  • The CMOS battery dies on my file-server (a FreeNAS box), taking it, and the zpools down with it. I fought over a long weekend to recover the data, and in the end, got it mounted read-only, and copied it off. New hardware, and new zpools, and we seem to be going again. Recovering services is taking a bit of time.
  • There is a bug with the ZFS on Root for Antergos Linux. Seems that it does not put all the kernel drivers in the init image when you upgrade. Last time, I booted off the install media to fix it. I lost that USB stick, so I downloaded a new one. Guess what? They have turned that feature off ZFS, so there is no way to recover. Since FreeBSD still does not support suspend/resume on the Acer C720 that is my small travel laptop, I have to reinstall Antergos and reload my data.
  • My main laptop, the HP R810G1 seems to be having major battery issues. I bought a new battery in Novembers, and it died. I bought a new one a couple of weeks ago, and it at first did not seem to be holding a charge. Now, the OS does not see the battery. I think I might need a ‘new’ laptop.

I am torn between getting something one or two reves old with a solid record in the size I want (sub 13″, under 1″ thin, and good 6+ hours of battery) or the latest shiny.

Other news, I have the ownCloud server upgraded to nextcloud, and everything I have tried works out of the box, which is a lot more than I can say for ownCloud. Last major thing I need to recover it the Plex Server!

Updates to AUR packages

So, with the migration of the AUR to version 4, I looked at the 12 AUR packages I had created over the years which I have not looked at in a long, long time.

The list started out with:

In the end, I only kept xlhttp as I do not use the others anymore. Surprisingly enough, only one of the packages (chronicle) was out of date. I disowned all the others, so if you want, you can pick them up.

Quick Ansible Tip

This is a quick post to capture something seen. Ansible is a configuration management tool that I have been learning recently. More details in a future post. This is just to capture this idea:

From: Smith, Chris (Big Data)

To: ansible

Ansible Galaxy is a centralised Github repository of public Ansible content, see: https://galaxy.ansible.com/ It uses a local routine that is installed when you install Ansible, called ‘ansible-galaxy’, to create a blank template for your Ansible content. What is not well known is you can run ‘ansible-galaxy’ in offline mode to create a blank template using the command:

# ansible-galaxy init –offline my-role

Enjoy,

Chris

More on this as I get some more back-ends stuff taken care of, like setting up a git repo and maybe auto-deploy from git push?

cli add

I have not updated cli.donharper.org – forget the GUI in a very long time, and I did have some nice tricks and tips there, so I decided to bring it over here.

It is all tagged with cli for easy searching, plus I added a whole mess of other tags.

Enjoy.

dd(8) with progress

I needed to write an iso image to a USB key, and the typical way is
with just dd(8), but I wanted a progress bar. A quick google later,
and I get:

pv -tpreb isoname | sudo dd of=/dev/sdd bs=1024

Which will write the iso image to the USB stick sdd, and give me a
progress bar, tell me how fast it is writing, and give me an eta when
finished. Perfect.

Clickable URL links in rxvt

So, I use rxvt as my daily interface to my computers. I also use mutt for my email reading pleasure. Sometimes, I get URLs in email and I want to read them in a browser. If I was using a GUI based mail reader, I would just click the URL to open it. Well, there is an easy way to set up rxvt to do that!

Using the fine Arch Linux wiki entry for rxvt unicode, the solution is quite easy. In the file ~/.Xdefaults, add:

URxvt.perl-ext-common: default,matcher
URxvt.url-launcher: /usr/bin/firefox
URxvt.matcher.button: 1

And either do a xrdb –merge ~/.Xdefaults or log out/log in. And start a new rxvt, and you are good to go.

An Update to ‘Window Managers?’

Way back, I wrote a quick blurb on Window Managers for running under X.

Well, a while back I switched to Ubuntu for my OS of choice. As you may know, the fine folks at Ubuntu switched to default window manager to something called Unity, which caused a stir. I tried it for a while, but decided that it was too heavy, and too mouse-centric.

So, what to do? Well, I went back to my old standby wmfs, Window Manager From Scratch. This is a modern WM with systray support, full Ximirama and Xrandr support, tiles, and is mainly driven from the keyboard. Life is good.

To install (same steps as for Fedora, RHEL, or Ubuntu), download the source, and install the needed development libraries for: X11, Xft, freetype, Xinerama, Xrandr, and Imlib2. I used the native packages from the OS. Then, simple do a

make
sudo make install

(you do build software as a normal user, right?)

This will install all the needed bits and configs into the correct place. Under Ubuntu 11.10, there was an entry from the login screen to let me chose wmfs.

Config is handled in $HOME/.config/wmfs/wmfsrc which you can copy from /etc/xdg/wmfs/wmfsrc.

EDIT 2016-11-30: It seems the domain is no longer active.
The wmfs website has very nice documentation as well as likes to some people’s configs with screen shots.

It runs very fast, and very lean:

 Private + Shared = RAM used Program 3.9 MiB + 310.0 KiB = 4.2 MiB wmfs

Check it out, I am sure you will like what you see.